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Showing posts from November, 2017

Desalination Costs coming down.

"Israeli scientists work to make desalination more efficient and affordable, among them, developed a chemical-free system using porous lava stone to capture the microorganisms before they reach the membranes. It's just one of the many breakthroughs in membrane technology that have starkly lowered the cost of desalination. Desalination used to be an expensive energy hog, but the scientists changed the game. Inside Sorek, the Israeli desalination plant that is the world's largest and most advanced, it costs just a third of what it did in the 1990s to desalinate sea water. Sorek can produce a thousand liters of drinking water for 58 cents. Israeli households pay about US$30 a month for their water - similar to households in most U.S. cities, and far less than Las Vegas (US$47) or Los Angeles (US$58)." 

https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/4017447/all

THE WATER INSTITUTE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (WISA) - The Water Professionals say ...

27 October 2017 SA Water Institute on Western Cape water crisis The water sector is filled with scientists and engineers that are trained to design, operate, and maintain a very complex system that needs to collect, treat, and distribute water to sustain life and business for South African citizens. Some of the challenges that these professionals face do indeed stem from unethical practices in both the public and private sector, but the current drought crisis adds an environmental component that places the existing water structures under extreme pressure. Water professionals have already been consulted in all possible alternative supply methods – including greywater reuse, stormwater harvesting, groundwater management, water efficiency at the city and in businesses, managed aquifer recharge, desalination, and wastewater reclamation as options. The city has also now adopted water sensitive design principles and we hope they lead the way for the rest of South Africa around integrated w…

Water Abundance in Cape Town?

CAPE TOWN NEEDS THREE MEGA WATER PROJECTS FOR FUTURE ABUNDANCE Cape Town. For immediate release: A new water crisis initiative has been launched to identify and push through three multi-billion rand projects to restore water security to Cape Town.
The aim is to move the agenda from a focus on water scarcity to one of abundance.
The new initiative is being launched following a meeting in Cape Town on Thursday of the Water Leapathon Advisory Board, a strategy forum which brings together representatives of business, academia, government, labour and concerned citizens.
“We have two areas of focus,” said Cape Messenger CEO Martin Humphries, who chaired the forum.
“In the short term we will help with getting the message across, and helping to mobilise businesses and individuals to take steps to cut water consumption.
“For this, we will identify examples of success, and share them.
“We are also convinced that there needs to be more thought about the long term.”
He said that for a longer-term respo…

A failed state?

From Anthony Turton on Facebook In a previous post I noted that the water situation across the whole country is deteriorating in a domino effect of incompetence and political infighting. I suggested that we are seeing state failure happen as the fabric of social control is being ripped apart. I then suggested that three critical areas should be monitored for the lessons learned: 1) Cape Town - for proactive intervention as a narrative of scarcity is converted into a narrative of future abundance; 2) Port Shepstone (Ugu) - for a failed state scenario; 3) and Gauteng - for a major city that has lost its water security due to state capture activities, that will inevitably plunge the local economy into increasing crisis as a result of the loss of resilience, but could still be turned around if credible leadership emerges in time. This post is about (2) Ugu, where we now have a form of water war underway. The water war literature is broadly divided into two genres: a) conflict over water (…